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Where can you get help for making change in your workplace as an employee?

If you are an employee struggling to meet the demands of your job—not because you aren’t qualified for your position, and not because you aren’t a committed worker, but because it’s impossible to balance all the different components of your life under the existing workplace rules—you aren’t alone. Workers across the country are in a similar predicament. But it can be scary to approach your employer to ask for change. Many organizations offer resources to help you make the case that by meeting your needs, your employer will benefit by fostering a more productive work environment.

  • Families and Work Institute has a toolkit of tip sheets, research, and success stories from a variety of businesses to help you make your case to your employer. (free)
  • The Employer Alliance offers a collection of implementation recommendations and success stories for flexible work arrangements as well as paid time off and other employee support schemes. (free)
  • The Society for Human Resource Management offers focus group summaries, webcasts, Senate testimony, a statement of public policy, and a Workplace Flexibility Resource Page to encourage change in the workplace that “reflects different work environments, representation, industries and organizational size.” (free)
  • The U.S. Department of Labor has a toolkit of case studies, articles, reports, and links to additional resources for you and your employer. (free)
  • When Work Works maps out how to ask for flexibility at work and how to make sure flexibility succeeds for employees and employers (free)
  • Work+Life Fit provides guidance in the form of books and articles on how to make the business case to your employer. (paid and free)
  • Work Options offers advice around what type of flexibility would be the best fit for you and provides planning packages to help with approaching your boss with a flexibility proposal. (paid)

Where can you get help for making change in your workplace as an employer?

If you are an employer who recognizes that it would be a sound business decision to approach work more strategically, you may need help drafting new rules that don’t conform to the traditional workplace mindset. Many organizations offer resources to help you build a healthier and more productive work environment.

  • Corporate Voices for Working Families has a collection of focus group results, success stories, and specific tips on creating flexible work arrangements for nonexempt hourly workers. (free)
  • CultureRX leads tailored workshops for businesses looking to become Results Only Work Environments (paid)
  • FlexPaths offers web-based products that help businesses implement flexible work arrangements and measure results. (paid)
  • Flex Strategy Group provides research and strategy consulting services to help businesses create a culture of productivity and flexibility. (paid and free)
  • The Employer Alliance offers a collection of implementation recommendations and success stories for flexible work arrangements as well as paid time off and other employee support schemes. (free)
  • The U.S. Department of Labor has a toolkit of case studies, fact sheets, issue briefs, articles, reports, and links to additional resources. (free)
  • Workplace Flexibility 2010, an initiative at Georgetown Law, offers case studies and fact sheets on workplace flexibility and telecommuting. (free)